Archipelago

Archipelago

Archipelago

Architect: Lene Tranberg, Lundgaard & Tranberg Arkitekter (Denmark)

Result: Not selected

 

The architectural concept of the new Nobel Center reflects and interprets the ‘spirit of place’ present on Blasieholmen; arising from the site specific with a solid anchoring in the Nordic spirit; while at the same time interpreting the universal phenonmenons of the solid bedrock and the topography of landscape. In this way the architectural concept unifies the local as well as the global aspects – honoring the spirit of the Nobel organisation.

In addition, it adds a recreational landscape pocket to the harbor promenade, inscribing itself in a form language that is more closely associated with the idea of the ‘archipelago bedrock’ than the built city. The architecture hereby becomes a generous, inviting gesture to the city and its inhabitants, ensuring that the new voluminous building is experienced not as a loss of quality, but rather as a positive addition to the life of the city.

Our aim is to create a building which articulates a powerful, outwardly focused, ‘cosmic’ architectural aura, expressing the universal and humanistic values of the Nobel organization as well as the global, forward-looking vision based on science and culture – an architecture that reaches out over time and place.

Our vision is to collect these ideas in an architectural concept that possesses a certain monumental ceremony, as well as a unique, nature-inspired sculptural power – all while falling naturally into place on the site, supporting and enhancing the experience of city and harbor, and giving the site a new meaning as a social and cultural node in the city. Metaphorically, the landscape base is seen as a large, stratified stone formation in the park; like the bedrock that, – like so many other places in Stockholm – reveals itself along the waterfront.

The cones appear as vertical, solitary objects that defer themselves to the harbor landscape’s horizontal dominance as the strongest element – like large oculus’s that gaze upward to infinity, or sensors that carefully listen for hints of the beginnings of the universe; a visual and symbolic coupling between the reaches of space and our planet, between the heavens and earth.

The conical forms have varying proportions and are arranged so that they each emphasize the formations of the terrain and between themselves create a well defined and strongly varied sequence of spaces. They take up the scale of the city and contribute to the rooting of the building complex in the overall urban picture, framing ever-changing views over the landscape plinth and appearing as iconic landmarks from all angles.

Precisely the absence of actual buildings on the site is the main architectural point, balancing the authenticity and dignity of the Nobel Center with a strong, independent visual identity that provides a contrast and foreground to the dense, urban cityscape.

As a reflection over the wonderful, dynamic, and boundless world of nature, the sculptural concept creates a spatial structure that blurs or even repeals the conventional definition of a static space and creates a more ethereal, lively, and limitless spatial universe, where experience of place and space becomes just as much a mental as a physical state.

The landscape is envisioned as a public space, accessible for all via lightly sloping terrain, ramps and stairs from the surroundings to the various plateaus, with movement framed by varied, indigenous vegetation. The terraces invite to pause and informal meeting in the sun, protected from the wind, with generous views over the city and harbor. Likewise, the outside spaces can be used for exhibitions, musical and theatrical performances, as well as activities for children and outdoor serving from the Nobel Center’s restaurant and café/bistro.

 

Pictures: Copyright Nobelhuset AB

Archipelago

Archipelago

Archipelago

Archipelago

Archipelago

Archipelago