June 2013 marked the beginning of a two-stage architectural competition to design the building that will become the Nobel Center.

Eleven prominent architects from eight countries faced the complex task of developing a conceptual proposal for the architectural design of the Nobel Center. This task also included explaining how the Nobel Center will relate to the surrounding urban and marine setting on the Blasieholmen peninsula and at Nybroviken, an inlet of the Baltic Sea. The architects had an extensive competition brief to their aid, which describes the activities that will take place at the Nobel Center and the requirements imposed on the building and its various functions. The brief also describes the unique waterfront location in central Stockholm that the building will occupy and the necessary consideration of the surrounding institutions and environment. (The competition brief is available for download below.)

There was an ambition to achieve a breadth among the architects who would be invited to participate in the competition, with internationally well-known names as well as smaller offices. Participating in the selection process were 142 architects spread across 25 countries and four continents.

In November 2013 three design proposals were selected for the second stage of the competition, and the anonymity of the entries ended.

  • Competition area boundaries

  • All competing architects gathered in Stockholm, june 2013.

  • Competition area boundaries

  • All competing architects gathered in Stockholm, june 2013.

Participating Architects and Submitted Entries

  • Butterfly – Kim Herforth Nielsen, Jan Ammundsen and Bo Boje Larsen, 3XN
  • PRISM – Bjarke Ingels, BIG
  • Nobelhuset – David Chipperfield & Christoph Felger, David Chipperfield Architects Berlin (shortlisted)
  • A Room and a Half – Johan Celsing, Johan Celsing Arkitektkontor (shortlisted)
  • “We believe in…” – Anne Lacaton and Jean-Philippe Vassal, Lacaton & Vassal Architectes
  • Archipelago – Lene Tranberg, Lundgaard & Tranberg Arkitekter
  • Landing Seagulls – Marcel Meili and Markus Peter, Marcel Meili, Markus Peter Architekten
  • Beyond 1210 – Rem Koolhaas and Reinier de Graaf, OMA
  • Nobel Sphere – Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, SANAA
  • The Space Between – Kjetil Thorsen, Snøhetta
  • A P(a)lace to Enjoy – Gert Wingårdh, Wingårdhs (shortlisted)

Before stage two of the competition, the jury announced its views in a statement to the competitors. One of the additions that were made in the competition brief was a reduction of the programme area. As a result, the buildings being proposed decreased in size, especially above ground. All three finalist proposals are located in the north-western corner of the site, allowing the creation of an attractive open space in a sunny position with plenty of room for strolling on the quay along the water. The architects also refined their proposals based on the jury’s desire for greater openness towards the surrounding public areas and walkways.

Design Proposals, stage 2

  • Nobelhuset by David Chipperfield och Christoph Felger, David Chipperfield Architects Berlin
  • The Nobel Snowflake by Gert Wingårdh, Wingårdh arkitektkontor
  • A Room and a Half by Johan Celsing, Johan Celsing arkitektkontor
  • The Nobel Snowflake

  • A Room and a Half

  • Nobelhuset

  • The Nobel Snowflake

  • A Room and a Half

  • Nobelhuset

In its assessment work, the jury attached great importance to the building’s adaptation to the surrounding cityscape and cultural environment, as well as how the external design fits together with the Nobel Prize and the identity of Nobel activities.

Of the three further refined proposals, a unanimous jury selected David Chipperfield’s and Christoph Felger’s slender brass shimmering building entitled “Nobelhuset” as the winner.

 

Design proposals, more information about the competition task, the process and the statement of the jury